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A multilevel house by architect Ray Kappe

7 July 2015 |

Los Angeles architect Ray Kappe designed his house situated in a canyon in Pacific Palisades in 1965. And it still resonates today.

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Once the LivingHomes founder Steve Glenn described feeling from the Ray Kappe’s house as giddy. And this is true: when you stand on the flying walkways enjoying a controlled explosion of space, multiple levels, vertical planes of wood, glass, and concrete you really feel giddy.

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The floor-to-ceiling windows attract natural light inside offering views of the lush hillsides in all directions. The materials, light, setting and space represent a perfect combination.

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Like the architect says, people should come out of cooped-up houses and enjoy nature and space. So, Ray designed split levels, terraces that form roofs, and flying walkways with multiple vantage points. “Manipulation of space is very important in his architecture,” says his wife and partner Shelly.

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Ray expressed his principles in his lovely dwelling. The 4,000-square-feet house is distributed over 7 levels and attached to 6 concrete towers, constructed on a 600 square feet of land.

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First the architect designed another house but when the family found out how much water there was and that it wasn’t possible to dig ordinary footings, Ray developed the tower system.

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When the family moved to the house in 1967 with their three kids, Shelly decorated it with fabrics, smoothly colorful pillows, and furniture that brought the feeling of completion. But the quality of space is the most striking feature of this house. Ray says he managed to combine the best of rational and intuitive design.

dwell.com

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